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27 October 201204:48PMlife

For no adequately explained reason, I've been keeping all my movie tickets since mid-2011 and sticking them to my bookshelf. I guess it's a good way to remember all the fun times I've had at the movies. Or something. I dunno.

Anyway, did you know that they print whether you paid cash or eftpos down the bottom of your ticket? I thought that was pretty interesting. So if, like, hypothetically, you had a stack of movie tickets going back to mid-2011, you could track whether or not you spent money by cash or by eftpos more over time, which I'm sure is very useful financial information. And hypothetically, if you were to make a pie chart out of that information, it would come out looking a lot like this:

That's actually not the whole story. Up to and including January the 10th, 2012, I paid cash every time. Then, inexplicably, on January 12th, 2012, I switched to eftpos and paid with invisible space electrons every time after that. I can offer literally zero explanation for this. I wasn't even aware I was doing it.

Lets see what other useful data is on tickets. I mean, there's seat number. That would be super useful! We could avoid the awkward "oh, where will we sit" conversation which we have every damn time if we had a statistically proven 'usual spot'... except, oh wait, we just ignore those seat assignments anyway. Never mind.

Right, so what about time?

That's... entirely unexpected. Like, maybe if we were still in high school, and in the habit of going to the movies every friday afternoon that would make sense, but the data doesn't stretch back that far. I guess we could put it down to a combination of old-habits-die-hard by the organisers, and also the fact that sleeping in is frickin' awesome. Oh, and that outlier? Batman. I think pretty much everyone was late to that one on account of not knowing how to deal with being up before 10am. Also, no midnight screenings. Disappoint, guys.

Let's look at days of the week:

This one baffled me a bit until Morgan pointed out that Thursday is when movies generally premiere. Friday is, of course, the day which I have consistently had off since I started uni. What's that you say? Not everyone has Fridays off? Well, sucks to be them. There's gotta be at least one advantage to doing an Arts degree, and I'm pretty sure that's it.

How about movie rating? I'm too slack to actually go through and sort them into genres, but this might give us some idea of what type of stuff we're watching, right?

Well, it's... reasonably adult stuff?

Actually, I'm not sure what I expected to learn from that. And here's another no-brainer:

FUN FACT: The moving picture palace which we make a point of always going to is, in fact, the one we usually go to. I should clarify that by 'we', I mean the same half-dozen guys I usually go to the movies with. There is a 1:1 correlation betwee the times when I go to different cinemas and the times I go with a different group of people.

Finally, let's make James Cameron squirm:

Yeeaaahh. Does anyone actually like 3D movies? I find it ads nothing. I stop noticing it after about 10 minutes unless they're doing anything gimmicky, and it kinda gives me a headache. I get that the idea is to entice more people to cinemas with something they can't get at home (even though they increasingly can) but honestly I've never really understood that. I go to a movie to see it first, and also to hang out with mates and tell James not to eat cookie dough raw because its bad for him, and then to go play video games and eat pizza. Enhancing the experience for me would be.. um, I dunno. Free pizza? Can that be a thing? Can we take all the money we would be spending on converting crap movies to 3D and spend it on buying every cinema patron a pizza, please? That'd be super great. I'd watch that movie.

(ps: If anyone knows how to correlate things over time in excel, could you let me know? or, even better, just do it for me? here's my data. awesome, thanks.)

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